Heathcliff is not a traditional hero.

Although, Wuthering Heights is said to be the most imaginative and poetic of all the Bronte's novels, Emily's book was not as popular as her older sister, Charlotte's, new release, Jane Eyre ("Bronte Sisters" 408).

Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights

In fact, the term Byronic hero, would fit Heathcliff’s description in every aspect....

Heathcliff arrives as a gypsy founding.

Due to Hindley’s torment and despicable treatment of Heathcliff and his strained relationship with Catherine, he develops a vengeful attitude starting from childhood....

Heathcliff has all these characteristics because of his experiences.

During the ups and downs of the story the choice of villains are numerous due to the characters emotions and choices but choosing Heathcliff was an obvious choice.

This raises the question: which Romantic Movement was most common in Wuthering Heights.

Catherine actually detested Heathcliff when they were younger....

The abusive patriarch and patriarchal family.
The male heads of household abuse females and males who are weak orpowerless. This can be seen in their use of various kinds ofimprisonment or confinement, which takes social, emotional, financial,legal, and physical forms. Mr. Earnshaw expects Catherine to behaveproperly and hurtfully rejects her "bad-girl"behavior. Edgar's ultimatum that Catherine must make a final choicebetweenhim or Heathcliff restricts Catherine's identity by forcing her torejectan essential part of her nature; with loving selfishness Edgar confineshis daughter Cathy to the boundaries of Thrushcross Grange. Avindictive HindleystripsHeathcliff of his position in the family, thereby trapping him in adegradedlaboring position. Heathcliff literally incarcerates Isabella (as herhusbandand legal overseer), and later he imprisons both Cathy and Nellie;also,Cathy is isolated from the rest of the household after her marriage toLinton by Healthcliff's contempt for and hatred of them.

Heathcliff’s entrance on page 12 causes a plea of shelter from Mr....

Self-imposed or self-generated confinement andescape.
Both Catherine and Heathcliff find their bodies prisons which traptheir spirits and prevent the fulfillment of their desires: Catherineyearns to be united with Heathcliff, with a lost childhood freedom,with Nature, and with a spiritual realm; Heathcliff wants possession ofand union with Catherine. Confinement also defines the course ofCatherine's life: in childhood,she alternates between the constraint of Wuthering Heights and thefreedomof the moors; in puberty, she is restricted by her injury to a couch atThrushcross Grange; finally womanhood and her choice of husband confineher to the gentility of Thrushcross Grange, from which she escapes intothe freedom of death.

Though, after Cathy and Heathcliff are dead, these similar souls joined...

“Wuthering Heights is a strange sort of book” (Douglas, WH p.301).

The effects of intense suffering.
In the passion-driven characters–Catherine, Heathcliff, andHindley–pain leads them to turn on and to torment others. Inflictingpain provides them some relief; this behavior raises questions aboutwhether they are cruel by nature or are formed by childhood abuse andto what extent they should be held responsible for or blamed for theircruelties. Is all their suffering inflicted by others or by outsideforces, like the death of Hindley's wife, or is at least some of theirtorment self-inflicted, like Heathcliff's holding Catherine responsiblefor his suffering after her death? Suffering also sears the weak;Isabella and her son Linton become vindictive, and Edgar turns into aself-indulgent, melancholy recluse. The children of love, the degradedHareton and the imprisoned Cathy, are able to overcome Heathcliff'sabuse and to find love and a future with each other. Is John Haganright that " is such a remarkable work partlybecause it persuades us forcibly to pity victims and victimizersalike"?

Heathcliff is introduced to the reader as anything but a hero in the beginning.

Hello Heathcliff, how can I help you.

There is consensus, in the academic community,1 that the primary antagonist in the novel, Heathcliff is largely motivated by a wanton lust for vengeance, and it is obvious from even a cursory reading that Edgar Linton, one of the protagonists, is mostly compelled by a his seemingly endless love for his wife, and it even seems as if this is reflected in the very nature of the characters themselves....

Remember Heathcliff's words: You teach me now how cruel you've been - cruel and false....

In Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff shared common life problems with Mr.

Lastly, the single most important incident of the book is when Heathcliff arrives to Edgar Linton’s residence in the Granges unannounced to see Catherine’s state of health....